Don’t hog the hug

By Sindhoor Pangal, Bangalore Mirror Bureau | May 9, 2016, 08.40 PM IST

Dogs don’t like being hugged

If you’ve been following any doggy news online, you must have come across the ongoing discussion about hugging dogs. For those of you who haven’t, here’s a gist.

Stanley Coren, a psychology professor and neuropsychological researcher who has published award winning books regarding the intelligence and mental abilities of dogs recently wrote an article for Psychology Today. The article details a study he did on photographs of people hugging dogs. His study revealed that more than 80 per cent of these dogs were giving out ‘calming signals‘.

Calming signals are signals that dogs give out when they are trying to calm themselves or others down, often indicating that there is a stressor around. Easily identifiable calming signals include licking of the lips, yawning, turning the face away, squinting and whale eyes (whites of the eye showing prominently).

After Coren published his article, several people raised questions. These are valid questions in the academic field of research. It was pointed out that the study was not sufficient to be conclusive. It was also pointed out that findings like these need to be corroborated by multiple sources.

There is another study going on in Norway called ‘Dog Pulse‘ that studies the heart of dogs in different situations. That study reveals some very interesting facts that might offer some additional information to understand this issue at hand. The study shows that a dog’s heart rate increases significantly when we hover over a dog or bend over a dog. Now that might make intuitive sense to us. If there was a species much larger than us that hovered over us, it’s easy to imagine that our heart rate would also spike.

The Pulse Project also reveals that walking straight up to a dog spikes up the dog’s heart rate. Now that is a less intuitive fact. To understand this, we need to know how dogs approach each other. They never walk up to each other unless it’s confrontational. In a non-confrontational approach a dog curves slightly around another dog. So it makes sense that dogs are perhaps not designed for calm full-frontal approaches.

In addition to this, we also have studies that show that chances of bites are much higher when a dog is being hugged or kissed. There are also several videos online that show a dog’s body language in slow motion as it’s being hugged or petted. The videos reveal dogs giving out several calming signals, just the way Coren’s photo study revealed.

All of this information is repeatedly pointing in the same direction—dogs don’t always love hugs. That does not mean they don’t like touch. Sometimes dogs will come up to you and ask for contact. But such a dog will happily accept a nice massage on the neck or like to be stroked on the shoulders. Of course many dogs do love sitting on people’s laps. They will enjoy that far more if they can continue to sit, without having to be restricted by your hug. Puppies will ask to be picked up sometimes. Again, there are several guides on the internet about how you can pick one up, without making the puppy feel restricted and while also giving the puppy maximum sense of freedom and not trapping them in a hug.

Yes, we need a lot more validation of this idea. But some articles that object to this idea make an incorrect leap from asking for more validation to then dismissing the result of the study as incorrect. With dogs, is it not always better to be safe than sorry? Does it not make sense that the study suggests an animal needs it space? Should we not learn to respect that space and not impose? Learn to read Calming Signals to let your dog guide you on what he likes and does not like. I like this video that shows how to read these signs when petting a dog:

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